Seán O Sullivan is a writer and curator whose work focuses on the politics and preservation of localities. He has curated projects and written critical texts dealing with subjects such as architecture, ecology and the bonds between people and places. He is a former chairman of Black Church Print Studio, Dublin. He holds an MA in Curation and a BA in Fine Art from IADT, Dún Laoghaire. He is currently Visual Arts Adviser to the Arts Council of Ireland / An Comhairle Ealaíon.

This page: An exhibition with BANK Collective, Gerard Byrne and Stephen Sutcliffe, and residencies with Critical Bastards, Fugitive Papers, Occupy Paper, Paper Visual Art and Seán O Sullivan.

Writer-in-residence

  • Ormston House
  • 13th Jul – 11th Aug 2012
    Stephen Sutcliffe, Writer-in-Residence (2010), detail, courtesy of the artist and Ormston House
    Stephen Sutcliffe, Writer-in-Residence (2010), detail, courtesy of the artist and Ormston House

    From the Press Release:

    Let us begin with a quote. Then a short snappy sentence. Weave an invisible thread through the parallels and disjunctures of image-text relations. Our aim? Blah-di-blah to draw you, the reader, in – the who; the what; the when; the where – to that basic human faculty of thinking in terms of images.

    In partnership with Limerick City Gallery of Art, Ormston House is pleased to present the fourth iteration of the Six Memos project: Writer-in-Residence. The project consists of an exhibition of works by BANK Collective, Gerard Byrne and Stephen Sutcliffe, and residencies for art writers and critics from Critical Bastards, Fugitive Papers, Occupy Paper, Paper Visual Art and independent writer, Seán O Sullivan.

    Providing the context for the project is Italo Calvino’s Harvard lecture on Visibility in which he warns us against losing the power to bring forth forms and colours from a string of black letters on the white page. With influences ranging from Goethe and Beckett to Carpaccio (the painter) and Felix The Cat, he encourages the interplay between the visualisation and verbalisation of thought. For Calvino, there are always images at the source of his stories: a man cut in two halves; a boy who lives in the trees; an empty suit of armour that moves and speaks – and these he calls Our Ancestors. Through fiction, criticism and personal essays, he wrote about visibility his whole life – a career of visions, indecisions and revisions.